Myths Busted

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Snacking late at night causes weight gain

FALSE

If you succumb to the midnight munchies, it will go straight to your hips, right? Not necessarily. You put on weight when you eat more food than your body needs, and don't do enough activity to burn it off. While some people may snack more when they stay up late, it's the amount and type of snacks that determine if the kilos will pile on, or not.

Choose snacks from the core food groups like dairy, fruit or grains if you're feeling hungry after dinner. Otherwise, to combat late night snacking or over eating at night, try to eat six regular meals throughout the day.




Avoid dairy when you have a cold

FALSE

Did your mum always tell you to slow down on the milk when you have a cold as it clogs up your nose and throat with mucus? The truth is that this common food myth is false! Milk does not cause mucus production. Due to the creamy texture of milk, some people feel that there is a temporary coating over the mouth and throat after drinking milk. This is not mucus – it's just the natural sensation of drinking milk and only lasts for a short period of time.




Taking vitamin tablets gives you all the nutrients you need

FALSE

If only it were that easy! Although vitamin and mineral supplements can be useful for some people as a "top up" when the diet is inadequate, or for increased requirements (such as pregnancy), they still don't give you all the nutrients you need. Supplements cannot give you adequate amounts of macronutrients - carbohydrate, fat, protein and dietary fibre to meet your needs. That's why a balanced diet full of a variety of nutritious foods from the core food groups is the best way to get all of the vitamins, minerals and macronutrients that you need each day.




Sugar makes kids hyperactive

FALSE

Does your child come home from birthday parties bouncing off the walls? Do you think it's all the sugar in the party food? It's actually not the party food. The reason they're hyped-up is more likely due to all of the excitement and activity at the party rather than the sugar in the party food. Studies have shown no direct link between consumption of sugary foods and increased hyperactivity in children. It is important to note "consume only moderate amounts of sugar and foods containing added sugars".




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